Photograph dating

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Professional dress historian, portrait specialist and photo ‘detective’, Jayne is familiar to family historians and costume enthusiasts world-wide through her photograph books and fashion history guides; expertise in dating photos from the Victorian and Edwardian periods and later; regular photo dating and dress history columns in genealogy, family history and social history magazines; monthly photograph blogs for the genealogy website Findmypast; and her attendance at a range of events, including expert photo dating at the annual Who Do You Think You Are? With a BA (Hons) degree in History, a MA degree in the History of Dress (Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London) and seven years’ curatorial experience at the National Portrait Gallery, London, Jayne is a highly-qualified, academically-trained historian and portrait (artworks and photographs) specialist.As an independent consultant, using her in-depth knowledge of fashion history and over 30 years’ accumulated experience of studying historical images, she has personally dated and interpreted many thousands of family photographs, postcards, cartes de viste, cabinet cards and hundreds of oil paintings, portrait miniatures, drawings and silhouettes.Save time - Find your Answers - The Kwik Way Easy to store and carry, Kwik Tip research guides are perfect for quick reference in the home, office, library, and on research trips.Family history and collecting old photographs are two very popular pastimes these days and old photographs can pose many questions such as ‘Who is it? Not many family photographs exist from that era unless they are beautiful images on a polished silver plate (that looks like a mirror).

Find the facts about your old photos with a Kwik Tip guide for: See the Kwik Tip Research Guides here.

The tintype photograph saw more uses and captured a wider variety of settings and subjects than any other photographic type.

It was introduced while the daguerreotype was still popular, though its primary competition would have been the ambrotype.

This is straightforward detective work for most images, but very early photographs can be misleading.

Numerous types of photographs appeared and then went out of favor throughout th 1800s.

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